Monday, 30 May 2011

Tamiya (1/48) and Revell (1/72) Fw 190 (2)







Progress on two of my current batch of Fw 190s. Above, Revell 1/72nd F-8 in sand/ olive green mottle scheme of SG 4 serving in Italy in early 1944. These Fw 190s had most of their markings except for the fuselage Balkenkreuze over-painted. I was tempted to just decal and paint over but then decided to have a go at producing a mask, filling in with black and then over-painting... WEM enamel sandgeld is far too dark for my tastes and has been lightened with light grey- which makes it look a little too 'pink'. Olivgün mottle still to come should hide that! Below Tamiya 1/48 A-3 to be finished in a III./JG 26 scheme with Adlerflügel 'eagle wing'  decoration.




Tuesday, 17 May 2011

The Focke Wulf 190 - edit January 2017










Above; new-tool 72nd scale Airfix Fw 190 in EagleCal decals for Klaus Bretschneider's "yellow 1N" 6./JG 300 wilde Sau 'porcupine'

I like to edit and update my blog pages from time to time, especially those that are 'most-viewed'. Herewith some views of the Tamiya 190 A-3 (1/48th) and the Revell F-8 (1/72nd) finished in SG 4 colours with the cowl Mickey mouse artwork. The Revell kit is starting to show a fair bit of flash now, and is no longer the best 72nd scale late Fw 190 Anton. The Tamiya A-3 is proving a little more tricky - the cowling, fuselage and lower and upper wings all have to be brought together at the same time to get them nicely lined-up !

I have a long way to go before rivaling Jes Touvdal's Fw 190 collection, but I intend to give him a run for his money!











I've also done some more work on the massive 24th scale Airfix kit. Thanks to a couple of builds on the Airfix Tribute forum I've stumbled on the solution to the engine length problem - omit part 36, the rear of the crankcase, highlighted in the photo below. The BMW 801 is the example on display at Duxford - note the bright alu of the cylinder heads and the brownish exhausts..click on the photos for a closer view.











..and as this page - for some reason - is the most popular on this blog, here is a special treat for new visitors - above, some of the Fw 190s finished on this blog, and, below, a couple of nice pics in my collection via Fw 190 author Jean-Yves Lorant; below, Priller in his 'black 13' 'Jutta' and a rare image of III./JG 54 A-8s seen in early 1945. Below that, three views of late-war Fw 190s belonging to JG 300, the leading Geschwader in the Defence of the Reich  or Reichsverteidigung







Thursday, 5 May 2011

Airfix Spitfire XII 1/48 - finished



Just a few additions and this one is finished. I can see where I've gone wrong here already - DL-K wasn't fitted with the retractable tailwheel for a start and I've drooped both ailerons (thank you Paul!)....oh well. Can't get through a build without making at least one (make that two or three..) major blunder(s). Finished in the markings of Sq. Leader Raymond Harries. Harries was appointed CO of 91 Squadron in December 1942. Based in Hawkinge this unit was one of the first to receive the new Griffon-engined Mark XII in April 1943.

Harries was ultimately the most successful pilot to fly a Rolls-Royce Griffon powered Spitfire, scoring 11 kills including a brace of Focke-Wulf Fw 190s on 25 May 1943. Flying Spitfire XII DL-K (EN 625), Harries intercepted Fw 190s from SKG 10:

" I was leading Blue Section on a defensive patrol. I had just returned to base, with my No 2, had just landed when the scramble signal was given from the watch office. We both immediately took off again, and saw enemy aircraft approaching Folkestone. I sighted one lone Fw 190 at sea level returning to France. I came in from his starboard side, delivering a three-second burst at 250 yards. The enemy aircraft hit the sea tail first, split in two, and sank immediately.."

The Fw 190 was thought to be Fw 190A-5 Wrk Nr 2511 of 6./SKG 10, flown by Oberleutnant Josef Keller.

"..I then spotted another Fw 190 to starboard. I flew straight over the top of it in order to identify it in the failing light. The enemy aircraft pulled his nose up and gave me a quick squirt. I pulled straight up to about 1000ft, and turning to port, dived right onto his tail, opening fire from 300 yards and closing to 150 yards. I fired a four-second burst, seeing strikes and flames all over the enemy aircraft. The enemy aircraft gradually lost height, with smoke and flames coming from it, skimmed for some distance along the surface of the water and then sank. I orbited around taking cine gun snaps of the oil patch and pieces of wreckage that were visible..."